Tonight: Nonken and Kubera interpret Byron at Roulette

Tonight at 8:00pm, Marilyn Nonken and Joe Kubera will join forces to premiere Michael Byron‘s new, monumental two-piano work The Ultra Violet of Many Parallel Paths at Brooklyn’s Roulette. “Byron’s music tends to be restrained, avoiding both drama and extravagance. It is also harmonically rich, rhythmically detailed, and exclusively virtuosic,” says the web page for the event; also on the program is A Manifesto of Sounding for solo cello by composer and performance artist Juho Laitinen. More information is available here, and you can purchase your tickets here. I’ll see you there.

A little while ago pianist Marilyn Nonken and composer Michael Byron camped out on a familiar Lower East Side terrace to record the below interview, in which they discuss the work, its complexities, and its challenges and opportunities for its interpreters. Enjoy.

Interpretations next Thursday

On Thursday, November 2, at 8:00pm, Marilyn Nonken and Joe Kubera will join forces to premiere Michael Byron‘s new, monumental two-piano work The Ultra Violet of Many Parallel Paths at Brooklyn’s Roulette. “Byron’s music tends to be restrained, avoiding both drama and extravagance. It is also harmonically rich, rhythmically detailed, and exclusively virtuosic,” says the web page for the event; also on the program is A Manifesto of Sounding for solo cello by composer and performance artist Juho Laitinen. More information is available here, and you can purchase your tickets here.

A little while ago pianist Marilyn Nonken and composer Michael Byron camped out on a familiar Lower East Side terrace to record the below interview, in which they discuss the work, its complexities, and its challenges and opportunities for its interpreters. Enjoy.

The sense of sound

Michaël Levinas.

Starting next Thursday, October 5, and running through Sunday, October 8, NYU and La Maison Française will present The Sense of Sound (Le sens du son), an exploration of the limits and possibilities of our aural sensations. According to the web page for the series:

Talks and roundtables are organized around a series of performances which include a concert featuring compositions of Michaël Levinas, a performance at the Park Avenue Armory of Boulez’s Répons by IRCAM’s Ensemble Intercontemporain, and the innovative production by Roland Auzet of Bertrand-Marie Koltes’s play In the Solitude of the Cotton Fields. Levinas; the director of l’IRCAM, Frank Madlener; and Auzet will participate in discussions around their work.

More specifically, at 5:00pm on Saturday, October 7, my lovely wife Marilyn Nonken will be performing two of Levinas’ solo piano works — Anaglyphe (Variations on a Secret Motif) and Etude No. 4 (The Tears of Sounds) — and, on the second half of the program, pianist Irina Kataeva-Aimard and mezzo-soprano Roula Safar will perform Olivier Messiaen’s epic song cycle Harawi. The performers will discuss all three works at a round-table before the program, which will also feature Levinas.

The performance will take place in Room 303 at NYU Steinhardt, 35 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10012. Admission is free. More information about the concert can be found at the Facebook page for the event. I look forward to seeing you there.

Friday music

Below, Marilyn Nonken performs the second of Arnold Schönberg’s Three Pieces (Opus 11) at the Neue Galerie last Wednesday night for a members-only audience.

For those who were unable to be there, fear not: she and her fellow musicians violinist Rolf Schulte and cellist Coleman Itzkoff will perform a similar program for the public at NYU later this year. See you at Cafe Katja later today for a nice big glass of Grüner Veltliner.

 

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Schönberg and Webern at the Neue Galerie next Wednesday

Richard Gerstl, Portrait of Arnold Schönberg (detail)

Next Wednesday night, July 19, at 6.30pm, members of the Neue Galerie will be treated to a concert of music by Arnold Schönberg and Anton Webern, performed by my lovely wife Marilyn Nonken and friends. Those esteemed friends are violinist Rolf Schulte and cellist Coleman Itzkoff, and they’ll be presenting the following program:

Arnold Schönberg: Three Pieces, Op. 11 (1909)

Arnold Schönberg: “Columbine” (from Pierrot Lunaire) (1911)

Arnold Schönberg: Song Without Words from the Serenade, Op. 24  (1924)

Anton Webern: Four Pieces for Violin and Piano (1910)

Arnold Schönberg: Verklärte Nacht, Op. 4  (1899)
Arranged for trio by Eduard Steuermann after poetry by Richard Dehmel,
inspired by Mathilde (Zemlinsky) Schönberg

Marilyn will also be discussing Schönberg’s early music in connection with the Neue Galerie’s current exhibit Richard Gerstl, exploring the community of artists to which he belonged. Here are a few bios of the participating parties:

Upon performing Schönberg’s piano music, Marilyn Nonken was recognized as “a determined protector of important music” (New York Times). A Steinway Artist and Associate Professor at New York University, she studied with Leonard Stein, Schönberg’s longtime assistant.

Fresh from his success at the Arnold Schönberg Center in Vienna, violinist Rolf Schulte is an expert in the music of the New Viennese School. He has recorded most of Schönberg’s chamber works, the Violin Concerto, and Phantasy, as well as music of Anton Webern.

Cellist Coleman Itzkoff, Artist-in-Residence on American Public Media’s Performance Today, has performed as soloist nationwide, recently giving his Walt Disney Concert Hall concerto debut. He performs regularly at the Aspen Music Festival, La Jolla SummerFest, Music@Menlo, and Bargemusic.

The concert is open to Neue Galerie members only, but if you must go, you can fix that by becoming a member yourself — it’s worth every penny. Tell ’em Arnold sent you.