A toast to … putting a point on it

I’ll be attending my usual residency at Cafe Katja this make a quick stop first just two blocks south at CW Pencil Enterprise, 15 Orchard Street, a charming boutique that opened last year and over which pencil maven Caroline Weaver presides.

As it happens, tomorrow, March 30, is National Pencil Day, Forbes magazine reports. Something there is in me that does love a pencil. As far as pens go, I’ll never give up my Pilot G-2 0.38mm standby, but the Pilot is aggressively plastic from end to end. The pencil is a little marvel of engineering, seemingly all-natural wood and graphite from tip to eraser, a writing implement that dates from the 16th century, when a graphite deposit was discovered in Cumbria, England. It is most likely the first writing instrument most of us used, apart from the crayon, and unlike the crayon the pencil has been a favorite tool of writers and editors for centuries. Among fans of the classic Blackwing 602 pencil, for example, have been John Steinbeck, E.B. White, Eugene O’Neill, Archibald MacLeish, and Vladimir Nabokov. The Blackwing 602 even has its own website, and The Hollywood Reporter, no less, traced its influence upon the entertainment industry in 2013. And so far as nature goes, Henry David Thoreau himself was the scion of a well-known New England pencil family.

Blackwing also offers the socially-conscious glow-in-the-dark Volume 811 pencil, “a tribute to libraries and the hope they represent.”

Although I’ve been using my Pilot to complete New York Times crossword puzzles for years, my first visit to CW Pencil Enterprise yesterday encourages me to pick up a pencil once again. In part, I suppose, this is humility — unlike the pen, the pencil comes with its own eraser, and we could all use a little more modesty in our daily lives; we all, the pencil’s eraser reminds us, make mistakes. CW Pencil Enterprise helpfully offers a sampler set of crossword puzzle pencils suitable for both the daily newsprint and Sunday glossy puzzles. You can also pick up a few Blackwing 602s and a box of 811s at the shop, but there are many, many more, along with a curated selection of related apparatuses, including sharpeners, erasers, and notebooks. For the kid in all of us, a separate sticker room fulfills all of your sticker needs, as it did for my two daughters yesterday evening. (I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Ms. Weaver’s own handsome book about the pencil, The Pencil Perfect, available for purchase here and at the store itself.)

So this afternoon at Cafe Katja I will raise a glass to the pencil, to Caroline Weaver, and to her CW Pencil Enterprise. I’ll see you there (and don’t worry if you forget a sharpener; I’ve got one of these on my key ring now).